review sentences on Google Doc

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Flashcards for all words (and some extras) on QUIZLET (Thanks to Tim S.) and synonyms and antonyms thanks to Amanda P.







e.c. word: ruddy
p.13 – “…it had not been light all day: and candles were flaring in the windows of the neighbouring offices, like ruddy smears upon the palpable brown air.”

e.c. word: inexorable
EXAMPLE sentence from the book:: p. 72 - “The inexorable finger underwent no change.”
Other examples: an inexorable opponent; a feeling of inexorable doom


e.c. word: opulence
p. 46 – “”There were great, round, pot-bellied baskets of chestnuts, shaped like the waistcoats of jolly old gentlemen, lolling at the doors, and tumbling out into the street in their apoplectic (agitated) opulence.”
Other example sentence: “The estate had formerly belonged to a gentleman of opulence and taste, who had bestowed some considerable attention to the adornment of his grounds.” – Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom’s Cabin



e.c. word: sordid
p. 37 “All your other hopes have merged into the hope of being beyond the chance of its (poverty's) sordid reproach. I have seen your nobler aspirations fall off one by one, until the master-passion, Gain, engrosses you.”



e.c. word: capacious
p. 34 - “He rubbed his hands; adjusted his capacious waistcoat; laughed all over himself, from his shoes to his organ of benevolence; and called out in a comfortable, oily, rich, fat, jovial voice:
‘Yo ho, there! Ebeneezer!’”




14th word: (to) recoil
p. 67 - “ He recoiled in terror, for the scene had changed, and now he almost touched a bed; a bare, uncurtained bed: on which, beneath a ragged sheet, there lay a something covered up…”
Other example: to recoil from the sight of blood



13th word: obscure
p. 64 - “They left the busy scene, and went into an obscure part of the town, where Scrooge had never penetrated before, although he recognized its situation and its bad repute.”
Other examples: an obscure village off in the country somewhere; My sister's husband likes obscure Anime movies as well as Japanese punk rock.



12th word: (to) wane
EXAMPLE sentence from the book:: p. 62 - “‘Lead on!’ said Scrooge. ‘Lead on! The night is waning fast, and it is precious time to me, I know. Lead on, Spirit!’”
Other example sentence: Then, as the afternoon shadows were waning, the party again took to the canoes and paddled on up the river.



11th word: affront
p. 57 – “”…he would have made a feint of endeavouring (trying) to seize you, which would have been an affront to your understanding, and would instantly have sidled off in the direction of the plump sister.”
Other example sentence: Turning his back on me was a deliberate affront.



10th word: dogged
p. 44 – “”Scrooge entered timidly, and hung his head before this Spirit. He was not the dogged Scrooge he had been; and though its eyes were clear and kind, he did not like to meet them.”
Other example sentence: His dogged persistence was constant and unwavering.


9th word: tumultuous
p. 39 “The noise in this room was perfectly tumultuous, for there were more children there than Scrooge in his agitated state of mind could count: and, unlike the celebrated herd in the poem, they were not forty children conducting themselves like one, but every child was conducting itself life forty.” (allusion to poem by William Wordsworth called “Written in March”)



8th word: dirge
p. 25–– “The spectre, after listening for a moment, joined in the mournful dirge; and floated out upon the bleak, dark night.”


7th word: (to) fetter / fettered
p. 23 – “ ‘You are fettered,’ said Scrooge, trembling. ‘Tell me why.’“


6th word: tacit / tacitly
p. 17 – “With an ill-will Scrooge dismounted from his stool, and tacitly admitted the fact (that it was time to go home) to the expectant clerk in the Tank, who instantly snuffed his candle out, and put on his hat.”
Other EXAMPLE sentences:
She indicated tacit approval by smiling and winking.
By not reprimanding us for our antics, Mrs. Reimer showed her tacit approval of the pterodactyl game.




5th word: (to) regale
p. 17 – “The owner of one scant young nose, gnawed and mumbled by the hungry cold as bones are gnawed by dogs, stooped down at Scrooge’s keyhole to regale him with a Christmas carol...”


4th word: misanthropic
p. 17 – “The water-plug being left in solitude, its overflowings sullenly congealed, and turned into misanthropic ice.”
EXAMPLE from other literature:
“Reuben, a moody man, and misanthropic because unhappy, strode onward with his usual stern brow and downcast eye, feeling few regrets...” – Nathaniel Hawthorne, Mosses From An Old Manse and other stories


3rd word: homage
p. 15– “But I have made the trial in homage to Christmas, and I’ll keep my Christmas humour to the last.”
Other EXAMPLE sentence: The musician paid a jazzy-classical homage to the Gershwin brothers in a rousing concert.


2nd word: morose
p. 13 – “What right have you to be dismal? What reason have you to be morose? You’re rich enough”
Other example sentences: He sat in moody silence, a morose and unsociable manner.




1st word: covetous (adj.)
having or showing a great desire to possess something, typically something belonging to someone else: she fingered the linen with covetous hands.

p. 12 – “Oh! But he was a tight-fisted hand at the grindstone, Scrooge! a squeezing, wrenching, grasping, scraping, clutching, covetous old Sinner!”