Recent Changes

Tuesday, January 30

  1. page Giver vocabulary edited ... -- antonyms blank word-map: {WordMap.doc} {BlankWM.pdf} 10th word: "luminous"…
    ...
    -- antonyms
    blank word-map:
    {WordMap.doc}{BlankWM.pdf}
    10th word: "luminous"
    Example sentence from the book: “ Her eyes were very luminous.”
    (view changes)
    7:07 am
  2. page Giver vocabulary edited ... blank word-map: {WordMap.doc} 13th 10th word: "luminous" Example sentence fro…
    ...
    blank word-map:
    {WordMap.doc}
    13th10th word: "luminous"
    Example sentence from the book: “ Her eyes were very luminous.”
    Other example sentences: The luminous dial on the clock showed five minutes to seven.
    "luminous" definition
    12th9th word: "anguish"
    Example sentence from the book: “He could still hear it when he opened his eyes and lay anguished on the bed where he received memories.”
    Other example sentences: The young man broke the girl's heart when he told her was going to marry her best friend. She was filled with anguish.
    "anguish" definition
    11th8th word: "obsolete"
    Example sentence from the book: “ It wasn’t a practical thing, so it became obsolete when we went to Sameness.”
    Other example sentences:Google wants you to skip the YouTube app on the iPhone, which is controlled by Apple, and go straight to its new YouTube mobile site on the Web, making the iPhone’s YouTube App obsolete. – from The New York Times technology reviews, July 7, 2010.
    "obsolete" definition
    "20 Obsolete English words that should make a comeback"
    10th word: "tentative"
    Example sentence from the book: “Tentatively he opened his eyes—not his snow-hill-sled eyes, for they had been open throughout the strange ride.”
    Other example sentences: “He lifted and advanced his left foot, not tentatively and hesitantly, but quickly and firmly, bringing it to rest on the lion's neck.” – from Michael, Brother of Jerry by Jack London
    "tentative(ly)" definition
    9th
    7th word: "torrent"
    Example sentence from the book: “He could see a bright, whirling torrent of crystals in the air around him”
    Other example sentences: The houses were swept away in the torrent.
    "torrent" definition
    8th6th word: "(to)
    Example sentence from the book: “What if they had all been instructed: You may lie? His mind reeled.”
    Other example sentences: My head is still reeling from the shock of hearing it.
    "reel(ed)"
    7th5th word: "integrity"
    Example sentence from the book: “ ‘Integrity,’ she said next. ‘Jonas has, like all of us, committed minor transgressions.’ She smiled at him. ‘We expect that. We hoped, also, that he would present himself promptly for chastisement, and he has always done so.”
    Other example sentences: “For that matter, she found in Billy a certain health and rightness, a certain essential integrity, which she prized more highly than all book learning and bank accounts.” – from The Valley of the Moon by Jack London
    "integrity"
    synonyms: honor, honesty, goodness, purity, honorableness
    6th4th word: "reprieve"
    Example sentence from the book: “ He had been given an unusual and special reprieve from the committee, and granted an additional year of nurturing before his Naming and Placement.”
    Other example sentences: He enjoyed the reprieve from responsibility during his weeklong vacation.
    "reprieve" definition
    5th word: "solemn"
    Example sentence from the book: “ ‘We failed in our last selection,’ the Chief Elder said solemnly.”
    Other example sentences: The judge was solemn as she pronounced the sentence.
    "solemn" - part 1
    "solemn" - part 2
    4th
    3rd word: "remorse"
    Example sentence from the book: “The public announcement had been sufficient to produce the appropriate remorse.”
    Other example sentences: “I do not feel remorse, because that woman, I profoundly hold, deserved her punishment.” – from Twenty Years After by Alexandre Dumas
    "remorse" definition
    3rd2nd word: "awed"
    Example sentence from the book: “Lilly looked up, her eyes wide. “The ceremony of Twelve,” she whispered in an awed voice.”
    Other example sentences: We felt awe when contemplating the works of Bach. / The observers were in awe of the destructive power of the new weapon.
    ...
    "palpable" - definition part 1
    -- "palpable" - definition part 2
    ...
    CREDIT words:
    "distraught"
    Example sentence from the book: “ ‘Distraught’ is too strong an adjective to describe salmon-viewing.”
    Other example sentences: When the girl went missing, her distraught parents could not be comforted or consoled.
    "distraught" - definition
    "solemn"
    Example sentence from the book: “ ‘We failed in our last selection,’ the Chief Elder said solemnly.”
    Other example sentences: The judge was solemn as she pronounced the sentence.
    "solemn" - part 1
    "solemn" - part 2
    "tentative"
    Example sentence from the book: “Tentatively he opened his eyes—not his snow-hill-sled eyes, for they had been open throughout the strange ride.”
    Other example sentences: “He lifted and advanced his left foot, not tentatively and hesitantly, but quickly and firmly, bringing it to rest on the lion's neck.” – from Michael, Brother of Jerry by Jack London
    "tentative(ly)" definition

    (view changes)
    7:07 am
  3. page Giver vocabulary edited ... "awed" - definition part 1 "awed" - definition part 2 2nd word: "d…
    ...
    "awed" - definition part 1
    "awed" - definition part 2
    2nd word: "distraught"
    Example sentence from the book: “ ‘Distraught’ is too strong an adjective to describe salmon-viewing.”
    Other example sentences: When the girl went missing, her distraught parents could not be comforted or consoled.
    "distraught" - definition

    1st word: "palpable"
    Example sentence from the book: “Now, thinking about the feeling of fear as he pedaled home along the river path, he remembered that moment of palpable stomach-sinking terror when the aircraft had streaked above.”
    ...
    "palpable" - definition part 1
    -- "palpable" - definition part 2
    EXTRA CREDIT words:
    "distraught"
    Example sentence from the book: “ ‘Distraught’ is too strong an adjective to describe salmon-viewing.”
    Other example sentences: When the girl went missing, her distraught parents could not be comforted or consoled.
    "distraught" - definition

    (view changes)
    7:04 am

Thursday, December 7

  1. page A Christmas Carol vocabulary edited ... p. 34 - “He rubbed his hands; adjusted his capacious waistcoat; laughed all over himself, from…
    ...
    p. 34 - “He rubbed his hands; adjusted his capacious waistcoat; laughed all over himself, from his shoes to his organ of benevolence; and called out in a comfortable, oily, rich, fat, jovial voice:
    ‘Yo ho, there! Ebeneezer!’”
    13th14th word: (to)
    p. 67 - “ He recoiled in terror, for the scene had changed, and now he almost touched a bed; a bare, uncurtained bed: on which, beneath a ragged sheet, there lay a something covered up…”
    Other example: to recoil from the sight of blood
    12th13th word: obscure
    p. 64 - “They left the busy scene, and went into an obscure part of the town, where Scrooge had never penetrated before, although he recognized its situation and its bad repute.”
    Other examples: an obscure village off in the country somewhere; My sister's husband likes obscure Anime movies as well as Japanese punk rock.
    11th12th word: (to)
    EXAMPLE sentence from the book:: p. 62 - “‘Lead on!’ said Scrooge. ‘Lead on! The night is waning fast, and it is precious time to me, I know. Lead on, Spirit!’”
    Other example sentence: Then, as the afternoon shadows were waning, the party again took to the canoes and paddled on up the river.
    10th11th word: affront
    p. 57 – “”…he would have made a feint of endeavouring (trying) to seize you, which would have been an affront to your understanding, and would instantly have sidled off in the direction of the plump sister.”
    Other example sentence: Turning his back on me was a deliberate affront.
    9th10th word: dogged
    p. 44 – “”Scrooge entered timidly, and hung his head before this Spirit. He was not the dogged Scrooge he had been; and though its eyes were clear and kind, he did not like to meet them.”
    Other example sentence: His dogged persistence was constant and unwavering.
    8th9th word: tumultuous
    p. 39 “The noise in this room was perfectly tumultuous, for there were more children there than Scrooge in his agitated state of mind could count: and, unlike the celebrated herd in the poem, they were not forty children conducting themselves like one, but every child was conducting itself life forty.” (allusion to poem by William Wordsworth called “Written in March”)
    7th8th word: dirge
    p. 25–– “The spectre, after listening for a moment, joined in the mournful dirge; and floated out upon the bleak, dark night.”
    6th7th word: (to)
    p. 23 – “ ‘You are fettered,’ said Scrooge, trembling. ‘Tell me why.’“
    5th6th word: tacit
    p. 17 – “With an ill-will Scrooge dismounted from his stool, and tacitly admitted the fact (that it was time to go home) to the expectant clerk in the Tank, who instantly snuffed his candle out, and put on his hat.”
    Other EXAMPLE sentences:
    (view changes)
    11:26 am
  2. page A Christmas Carol vocabulary edited ... {WordMap.doc} Flashcards for all words (and some extras) on QUIZLET (Thanks to Tim S.) and s…
    ...
    {WordMap.doc}
    Flashcards for all words (and some extras) on QUIZLET (Thanks to Tim S.) and synonyms and antonyms thanks to Amanda P.
    e.c. word: misanthropic
    p. 17 – “The water-plug being left in solitude, its overflowings sullenly congealed, and turned into misanthropic ice.”
    EXAMPLE from other literature:
    “Reuben, a moody man, and misanthropic because unhappy, strode onward with his usual stern brow and downcast eye, feeling few regrets...” – Nathaniel Hawthorne, Mosses From An Old Manse and other stories
    media type=custom key=11348436

    e.c. word: ruddy
    p.13 – “…it had not been light all day: and candles were flaring in the windows of the neighbouring offices, like ruddy smears upon the palpable brown air.”
    media type=custom key=11255202
    e.c. word: inexorable
    EXAMPLE sentence from the book:: p. 72 - “The inexorable finger underwent no change.”
    Other examples: an inexorable opponent; a feeling of inexorable doom
    media type=custom key=11807270
    e.c. word: opulence
    p. 46 – “”There were great, round, pot-bellied baskets of chestnuts, shaped like the waistcoats of jolly old gentlemen, lolling at the doors, and tumbling out into the street in their apoplectic (agitated) opulence.”
    Other example sentence: “The estate had formerly belonged to a gentleman of opulence and taste, who had bestowed some considerable attention to the adornment of his grounds.” – Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom’s Cabin
    media type=custom key=11597080
    e.c. word: sordid
    p. 37 “All your other hopes have merged into the hope of being beyond the chance of its (poverty's) sordid reproach. I have seen your nobler aspirations fall off one by one, until the master-passion, Gain, engrosses you.”
    media type=custom key=11514466
    e.c. word: capacious
    p. 34 - “He rubbed his hands; adjusted his capacious waistcoat; laughed all over himself, from his shoes to his organ of benevolence; and called out in a comfortable, oily, rich, fat, jovial voice:
    ‘Yo ho, there! Ebeneezer!’”
    media type=custom key=11494862
    13th word: (to) recoil
    p. 67 - “ He recoiled in terror, for the scene had changed, and now he almost touched a bed; a bare, uncurtained bed: on which, beneath a ragged sheet, there lay a something covered up…”
    Other example: to recoil from the sight of blood
    media type=custom key=11765202
    12th word: obscure
    p. 64 - “They left the busy scene, and went into an obscure part of the town, where Scrooge had never penetrated before, although he recognized its situation and its bad repute.”
    Other examples: an obscure village off in the country somewhere; My sister's husband likes obscure Anime movies as well as Japanese punk rock.
    media type=custom key=11757934
    11th word: (to) wane
    EXAMPLE sentence from the book:: p. 62 - “‘Lead on!’ said Scrooge. ‘Lead on! The night is waning fast, and it is precious time to me, I know. Lead on, Spirit!’”
    Other example sentence: Then, as the afternoon shadows were waning, the party again took to the canoes and paddled on up the river.
    media type=custom key=11635036
    10th word: affront
    p. 57 – “”…he would have made a feint of endeavouring (trying) to seize you, which would have been an affront to your understanding, and would instantly have sidled off in the direction of the plump sister.”
    Other example sentence: Turning his back on me was a deliberate affront.
    media type=custom key=11635032
    9th word: dogged
    p. 44 – “”Scrooge entered timidly, and hung his head before this Spirit. He was not the dogged Scrooge he had been; and though its eyes were clear and kind, he did not like to meet them.”
    Other example sentence: His dogged persistence was constant and unwavering.
    media type=custom key=11574732
    8th word: tumultuous
    p. 39 “The noise in this room was perfectly tumultuous, for there were more children there than Scrooge in his agitated state of mind could count: and, unlike the celebrated herd in the poem, they were not forty children conducting themselves like one, but every child was conducting itself life forty.” (allusion to poem by William Wordsworth called “Written in March”)
    media type=custom key=11530880
    7th word: dirge
    p. 25–– “The spectre, after listening for a moment, joined in the mournful dirge; and floated out upon the bleak, dark night.”
    media type=custom key=11478826
    6th word: (to) fetter / fettered
    p. 23 – “ ‘You are fettered,’ said Scrooge, trembling. ‘Tell me why.’“
    media type=custom key=11413430
    5th word: tacit / tacitly
    p. 17 – “With an ill-will Scrooge dismounted from his stool, and tacitly admitted the fact (that it was time to go home) to the expectant clerk in the Tank, who instantly snuffed his candle out, and put on his hat.”
    ...
    She indicated tacit approval by smiling and winking.
    By not reprimanding us for our antics, Mrs. Reimer showed her tacit approval of the pterodactyl game.
    media type=custom key=11399456
    4th
    5th word: (to)
    p. 17 – “The owner of one scant young nose, gnawed and mumbled by the hungry cold as bones are gnawed by dogs, stooped down at Scrooge’s keyhole to regale him with a Christmas carol...”
    media type=custom key=113486964th word: misanthropic
    p. 17 – “The water-plug being left in solitude, its overflowings sullenly congealed, and turned into misanthropic ice.”
    EXAMPLE from other literature:
    “Reuben, a moody man, and misanthropic because unhappy, strode onward with his usual stern brow and downcast eye, feeling few regrets...” – Nathaniel Hawthorne, Mosses From An Old Manse and other stories

    3rd word: homage
    p. 15– “But I have made the trial in homage to Christmas, and I’ll keep my Christmas humour to the last.”
    Other EXAMPLE sentence: The musician paid a jazzy-classical homage to the Gershwin brothers in a rousing concert.
    media type=custom key=11317586
    2nd word: morose
    p. 13 – “What right have you to be dismal? What reason have you to be morose? You’re rich enough”
    Other example sentences: He sat in moody silence, a morose and unsociable manner.
    media type=custom key=11317342
    1st word: covetous (adj.)
    having or showing a great desire to possess something, typically something belonging to someone else: she fingered the linen with covetous hands.
    p. 12 – “Oh! But he was a tight-fisted hand at the grindstone, Scrooge! a squeezing, wrenching, grasping, scraping, clutching, covetous old Sinner!”
    media type=custom key=11255026
    (view changes)
    11:25 am
  3. page A Christmas Carol vocabulary edited ... {WordMap.doc} Flashcards for all words (and some extras) on QUIZLET (Thanks to Tim S.) and s…
    ...
    {WordMap.doc}
    Flashcards for all words (and some extras) on QUIZLET (Thanks to Tim S.) and synonyms and antonyms thanks to Amanda P.
    e.c. word: misanthropic
    p. 17 – “The water-plug being left in solitude, its overflowings sullenly congealed, and turned into misanthropic ice.”
    EXAMPLE from other literature:
    “Reuben, a moody man, and misanthropic because unhappy, strode onward with his usual stern brow and downcast eye, feeling few regrets...” – Nathaniel Hawthorne, Mosses From An Old Manse and other stories
    media type=custom key=11348436

    e.c. word: ruddy
    p.13 – “…it had not been light all day: and candles were flaring in the windows of the neighbouring offices, like ruddy smears upon the palpable brown air.”
    media type=custom key=11255202
    e.c. word: inexorable
    EXAMPLE sentence from the book:: p. 72 - “The inexorable finger underwent no change.”
    Other examples: an inexorable opponent; a feeling of inexorable doom
    media type=custom key=11807270
    e.c. word: opulence
    p. 46 – “”There were great, round, pot-bellied baskets of chestnuts, shaped like the waistcoats of jolly old gentlemen, lolling at the doors, and tumbling out into the street in their apoplectic (agitated) opulence.”
    Other example sentence: “The estate had formerly belonged to a gentleman of opulence and taste, who had bestowed some considerable attention to the adornment of his grounds.” – Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom’s Cabin
    media type=custom key=11597080
    e.c. word: sordid
    p. 37 “All your other hopes have merged into the hope of being beyond the chance of its (poverty's) sordid reproach. I have seen your nobler aspirations fall off one by one, until the master-passion, Gain, engrosses you.”
    media type=custom key=11514466
    e.c. word: capacious
    p. 34 - “He rubbed his hands; adjusted his capacious waistcoat; laughed all over himself, from his shoes to his organ of benevolence; and called out in a comfortable, oily, rich, fat, jovial voice:
    ‘Yo ho, there! Ebeneezer!’”
    media type=custom key=11494862
    13th word: (to) recoil
    p. 67 - “ He recoiled in terror, for the scene had changed, and now he almost touched a bed; a bare, uncurtained bed: on which, beneath a ragged sheet, there lay a something covered up…”
    Other example: to recoil from the sight of blood
    media type=custom key=11765202
    12th word: obscure
    p. 64 - “They left the busy scene, and went into an obscure part of the town, where Scrooge had never penetrated before, although he recognized its situation and its bad repute.”
    Other examples: an obscure village off in the country somewhere; My sister's husband likes obscure Anime movies as well as Japanese punk rock.
    media type=custom key=11757934
    11th word: (to) wane
    EXAMPLE sentence from the book:: p. 62 - “‘Lead on!’ said Scrooge. ‘Lead on! The night is waning fast, and it is precious time to me, I know. Lead on, Spirit!’”
    Other example sentence: Then, as the afternoon shadows were waning, the party again took to the canoes and paddled on up the river.
    media type=custom key=11635036
    10th word: affront
    p. 57 – “”…he would have made a feint of endeavouring (trying) to seize you, which would have been an affront to your understanding, and would instantly have sidled off in the direction of the plump sister.”
    Other example sentence: Turning his back on me was a deliberate affront.
    media type=custom key=11635032
    9th word: dogged
    p. 44 – “”Scrooge entered timidly, and hung his head before this Spirit. He was not the dogged Scrooge he had been; and though its eyes were clear and kind, he did not like to meet them.”
    Other example sentence: His dogged persistence was constant and unwavering.
    media type=custom key=11574732
    8th word: tumultuous
    p. 39 “The noise in this room was perfectly tumultuous, for there were more children there than Scrooge in his agitated state of mind could count: and, unlike the celebrated herd in the poem, they were not forty children conducting themselves like one, but every child was conducting itself life forty.” (allusion to poem by William Wordsworth called “Written in March”)
    media type=custom key=11530880
    7th word: dirge
    p. 25–– “The spectre, after listening for a moment, joined in the mournful dirge; and floated out upon the bleak, dark night.”
    media type=custom key=11478826
    6th word: (to) fetter / fettered
    p. 23 – “ ‘You are fettered,’ said Scrooge, trembling. ‘Tell me why.’“
    media type=custom key=11413430
    5th word: tacit / tacitly
    p. 17 – “With an ill-will Scrooge dismounted from his stool, and tacitly admitted the fact (that it was time to go home) to the expectant clerk in the Tank, who instantly snuffed his candle out, and put on his hat.”
    ...
    She indicated tacit approval by smiling and winking.
    By not reprimanding us for our antics, Mrs. Reimer showed her tacit approval of the pterodactyl game.
    5thmedia type=custom key=11399456
    4th
    word: (to)
    p. 17 – “The owner of one scant young nose, gnawed and mumbled by the hungry cold as bones are gnawed by dogs, stooped down at Scrooge’s keyhole to regale him with a Christmas carol...”
    4th word: misanthropic
    p. 17 – “The water-plug being left in solitude, its overflowings sullenly congealed, and turned into misanthropic ice.”
    EXAMPLE from other literature:
    “Reuben, a moody man, and misanthropic because unhappy, strode onward with his usual stern brow and downcast eye, feeling few regrets...” – Nathaniel Hawthorne, Mosses From An Old Manse and other stories
    media type=custom key=11348696
    3rd word: homage
    p. 15– “But I have made the trial in homage to Christmas, and I’ll keep my Christmas humour to the last.”
    Other EXAMPLE sentence: The musician paid a jazzy-classical homage to the Gershwin brothers in a rousing concert.
    media type=custom key=11317586
    2nd word: morose
    p. 13 – “What right have you to be dismal? What reason have you to be morose? You’re rich enough”
    Other example sentences: He sat in moody silence, a morose and unsociable manner.
    media type=custom key=11317342
    1st word: covetous (adj.)
    having or showing a great desire to possess something, typically something belonging to someone else: she fingered the linen with covetous hands.
    p. 12 – “Oh! But he was a tight-fisted hand at the grindstone, Scrooge! a squeezing, wrenching, grasping, scraping, clutching, covetous old Sinner!”
    media type=custom key=11255026
    (view changes)
    11:25 am
  4. page A Christmas Carol vocabulary edited ... {WordMap.doc} Flashcards for all words (and some extras) on QUIZLET (Thanks to Tim S.) and s…
    ...
    {WordMap.doc}
    Flashcards for all words (and some extras) on QUIZLET (Thanks to Tim S.) and synonyms and antonyms thanks to Amanda P.
    e.c. word: misanthropic
    p. 17 – “The water-plug being left in solitude, its overflowings sullenly congealed, and turned into misanthropic ice.”
    EXAMPLE from other literature:
    “Reuben, a moody man, and misanthropic because unhappy, strode onward with his usual stern brow and downcast eye, feeling few regrets...” – Nathaniel Hawthorne, Mosses From An Old Manse and other stories
    media type=custom key=11348436

    e.c. word: ruddy
    p.13 – “…it had not been light all day: and candles were flaring in the windows of the neighbouring offices, like ruddy smears upon the palpable brown air.”
    media type=custom key=11255202
    e.c. word: inexorable
    EXAMPLE sentence from the book:: p. 72 - “The inexorable finger underwent no change.”
    Other examples: an inexorable opponent; a feeling of inexorable doom
    media type=custom key=11807270
    e.c. word: opulence
    p. 46 – “”There were great, round, pot-bellied baskets of chestnuts, shaped like the waistcoats of jolly old gentlemen, lolling at the doors, and tumbling out into the street in their apoplectic (agitated) opulence.”
    Other example sentence: “The estate had formerly belonged to a gentleman of opulence and taste, who had bestowed some considerable attention to the adornment of his grounds.” – Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom’s Cabin
    media type=custom key=11597080
    e.c. word: sordid
    p. 37 “All your other hopes have merged into the hope of being beyond the chance of its (poverty's) sordid reproach. I have seen your nobler aspirations fall off one by one, until the master-passion, Gain, engrosses you.”
    media type=custom key=11514466
    e.c. word: capacious
    p. 34 - “He rubbed his hands; adjusted his capacious waistcoat; laughed all over himself, from his shoes to his organ of benevolence; and called out in a comfortable, oily, rich, fat, jovial voice:
    ‘Yo ho, there! Ebeneezer!’”
    media type=custom key=11494862
    13th word: (to) recoil
    p. 67 - “ He recoiled in terror, for the scene had changed, and now he almost touched a bed; a bare, uncurtained bed: on which, beneath a ragged sheet, there lay a something covered up…”
    Other example: to recoil from the sight of blood
    media type=custom key=11765202
    12th word: obscure
    p. 64 - “They left the busy scene, and went into an obscure part of the town, where Scrooge had never penetrated before, although he recognized its situation and its bad repute.”
    Other examples: an obscure village off in the country somewhere; My sister's husband likes obscure Anime movies as well as Japanese punk rock.
    media type=custom key=11757934
    11th word: (to) wane
    EXAMPLE sentence from the book:: p. 62 - “‘Lead on!’ said Scrooge. ‘Lead on! The night is waning fast, and it is precious time to me, I know. Lead on, Spirit!’”
    Other example sentence: Then, as the afternoon shadows were waning, the party again took to the canoes and paddled on up the river.
    media type=custom key=11635036
    10th word: affront
    p. 57 – “”…he would have made a feint of endeavouring (trying) to seize you, which would have been an affront to your understanding, and would instantly have sidled off in the direction of the plump sister.”
    Other example sentence: Turning his back on me was a deliberate affront.
    media type=custom key=11635032
    9th word: dogged
    p. 44 – “”Scrooge entered timidly, and hung his head before this Spirit. He was not the dogged Scrooge he had been; and though its eyes were clear and kind, he did not like to meet them.”
    Other example sentence: His dogged persistence was constant and unwavering.
    media type=custom key=11574732
    8th word: tumultuous
    p. 39 “The noise in this room was perfectly tumultuous, for there were more children there than Scrooge in his agitated state of mind could count: and, unlike the celebrated herd in the poem, they were not forty children conducting themselves like one, but every child was conducting itself life forty.” (allusion to poem by William Wordsworth called “Written in March”)
    media type=custom key=11530880
    7th word: dirge
    p. 25–– “The spectre, after listening for a moment, joined in the mournful dirge; and floated out upon the bleak, dark night.”
    media type=custom key=11478826
    6th word: (to) fetter / fettered
    p. 23 – “ ‘You are fettered,’ said Scrooge, trembling. ‘Tell me why.’“
    media type=custom key=11413430
    5th word: tacit / tacitly
    p. 17 – “With an ill-will Scrooge dismounted from his stool, and tacitly admitted the fact (that it was time to go home) to the expectant clerk in the Tank, who instantly snuffed his candle out, and put on his hat.”
    ...
    She indicated tacit approval by smiling and winking.
    By not reprimanding us for our antics, Mrs. Reimer showed her tacit approval of the pterodactyl game.
    media type=custom key=11399456
    5th word: (to) regale
    p. 17 – “The owner of one scant young nose, gnawed and mumbled by the hungry cold as bones are gnawed by dogs, stooped down at Scrooge’s keyhole to regale him with a Christmas carol...”
    media type=custom key=113486964th word: misanthropic
    p. 17 – “The water-plug being left in solitude, its overflowings sullenly congealed, and turned into misanthropic ice.”
    EXAMPLE from other literature:
    “Reuben, a moody man, and misanthropic because unhappy, strode onward with his usual stern brow and downcast eye, feeling few regrets...” – Nathaniel Hawthorne, Mosses From An Old Manse and other stories

    3rd word: homage
    p. 15– “But I have made the trial in homage to Christmas, and I’ll keep my Christmas humour to the last.”
    Other EXAMPLE sentence: The musician paid a jazzy-classical homage to the Gershwin brothers in a rousing concert.
    media type=custom key=11317586
    2nd word: morose
    p. 13 – “What right have you to be dismal? What reason have you to be morose? You’re rich enough”
    Other example sentences: He sat in moody silence, a morose and unsociable manner.
    media type=custom key=11317342
    1st word: covetous (adj.)
    having or showing a great desire to possess something, typically something belonging to someone else: she fingered the linen with covetous hands.
    p. 12 – “Oh! But he was a tight-fisted hand at the grindstone, Scrooge! a squeezing, wrenching, grasping, scraping, clutching, covetous old Sinner!”
    media type=custom key=11255026
    (view changes)
    11:24 am
  5. page A Christmas Carol vocabulary edited ... {WordMap.doc} Flashcards for all words (and some extras) on QUIZLET (Thanks to Tim S.) and s…
    ...
    {WordMap.doc}
    Flashcards for all words (and some extras) on QUIZLET (Thanks to Tim S.) and synonyms and antonyms thanks to Amanda P.
    e.c. word: misanthropic
    p. 17 – “The water-plug being left in solitude, its overflowings sullenly congealed, and turned into misanthropic ice.”
    EXAMPLE from other literature:
    “Reuben, a moody man, and misanthropic because unhappy, strode onward with his usual stern brow and downcast eye, feeling few regrets...” – Nathaniel Hawthorne, Mosses From An Old Manse and other stories
    media type=custom key=11348436

    e.c. word: ruddy
    p.13 – “…it had not been light all day: and candles were flaring in the windows of the neighbouring offices, like ruddy smears upon the palpable brown air.”
    media type=custom key=11255202
    e.c. word: inexorable
    EXAMPLE sentence from the book:: p. 72 - “The inexorable finger underwent no change.”
    Other examples: an inexorable opponent; a feeling of inexorable doom
    media type=custom key=11807270
    e.c. word: opulence
    p. 46 – “”There were great, round, pot-bellied baskets of chestnuts, shaped like the waistcoats of jolly old gentlemen, lolling at the doors, and tumbling out into the street in their apoplectic (agitated) opulence.”
    Other example sentence: “The estate had formerly belonged to a gentleman of opulence and taste, who had bestowed some considerable attention to the adornment of his grounds.” – Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom’s Cabin
    media type=custom key=11597080
    e.c. word: sordid
    p. 37 “All your other hopes have merged into the hope of being beyond the chance of its (poverty's) sordid reproach. I have seen your nobler aspirations fall off one by one, until the master-passion, Gain, engrosses you.”
    media type=custom key=11514466
    e.c. word: capacious
    p. 34 - “He rubbed his hands; adjusted his capacious waistcoat; laughed all over himself, from his shoes to his organ of benevolence; and called out in a comfortable, oily, rich, fat, jovial voice:
    ‘Yo ho, there! Ebeneezer!’”
    media type=custom key=11494862
    13th word: (to) recoil
    p. 67 - “ He recoiled in terror, for the scene had changed, and now he almost touched a bed; a bare, uncurtained bed: on which, beneath a ragged sheet, there lay a something covered up…”
    Other example: to recoil from the sight of blood
    media type=custom key=11765202
    12th word: obscure
    p. 64 - “They left the busy scene, and went into an obscure part of the town, where Scrooge had never penetrated before, although he recognized its situation and its bad repute.”
    Other examples: an obscure village off in the country somewhere; My sister's husband likes obscure Anime movies as well as Japanese punk rock.
    media type=custom key=11757934
    11th word: (to) wane
    EXAMPLE sentence from the book:: p. 62 - “‘Lead on!’ said Scrooge. ‘Lead on! The night is waning fast, and it is precious time to me, I know. Lead on, Spirit!’”
    Other example sentence: Then, as the afternoon shadows were waning, the party again took to the canoes and paddled on up the river.
    media type=custom key=11635036
    10th word: affront
    p. 57 – “”…he would have made a feint of endeavouring (trying) to seize you, which would have been an affront to your understanding, and would instantly have sidled off in the direction of the plump sister.”
    Other example sentence: Turning his back on me was a deliberate affront.
    media type=custom key=11635032
    9th word: dogged
    p. 44 – “”Scrooge entered timidly, and hung his head before this Spirit. He was not the dogged Scrooge he had been; and though its eyes were clear and kind, he did not like to meet them.”
    Other example sentence: His dogged persistence was constant and unwavering.
    media type=custom key=11574732
    8th word: tumultuous
    p. 39 “The noise in this room was perfectly tumultuous, for there were more children there than Scrooge in his agitated state of mind could count: and, unlike the celebrated herd in the poem, they were not forty children conducting themselves like one, but every child was conducting itself life forty.” (allusion to poem by William Wordsworth called “Written in March”)
    media type=custom key=11530880
    7th word: dirge
    p. 25–– “The spectre, after listening for a moment, joined in the mournful dirge; and floated out upon the bleak, dark night.”
    media type=custom key=11478826
    6th word: (to) fetter / fettered
    p. 23 – “ ‘You are fettered,’ said Scrooge, trembling. ‘Tell me why.’“
    media type=custom key=11413430
    5th word: tacit / tacitly
    p. 17 – “With an ill-will Scrooge dismounted from his stool, and tacitly admitted the fact (that it was time to go home) to the expectant clerk in the Tank, who instantly snuffed his candle out, and put on his hat.”
    ...
    She indicated tacit approval by smiling and winking.
    By not reprimanding us for our antics, Mrs. Reimer showed her tacit approval of the pterodactyl game.
    media type=custom key=11399456
    5th word: (to) regale
    p. 17 – “The owner of one scant young nose, gnawed and mumbled by the hungry cold as bones are gnawed by dogs, stooped down at Scrooge’s keyhole to regale him with a Christmas carol...”
    4th word: misanthropic
    p. 17 – “The water-plug being left in solitude, its overflowings sullenly congealed, and turned into misanthropic ice.”
    EXAMPLE from other literature:
    “Reuben, a moody man, and misanthropic because unhappy, strode onward with his usual stern brow and downcast eye, feeling few regrets...” – Nathaniel Hawthorne, Mosses From An Old Manse and other stories
    media type=custom key=11348696
    3rd word: homage
    p. 15– “But I have made the trial in homage to Christmas, and I’ll keep my Christmas humour to the last.”
    Other EXAMPLE sentence: The musician paid a jazzy-classical homage to the Gershwin brothers in a rousing concert.
    media type=custom key=11317586
    2nd word: morose
    p. 13 – “What right have you to be dismal? What reason have you to be morose? You’re rich enough”
    Other example sentences: He sat in moody silence, a morose and unsociable manner.
    media type=custom key=11317342
    1st word: covetous (adj.)
    having or showing a great desire to possess something, typically something belonging to someone else: she fingered the linen with covetous hands.
    p. 12 – “Oh! But he was a tight-fisted hand at the grindstone, Scrooge! a squeezing, wrenching, grasping, scraping, clutching, covetous old Sinner!”
    media type=custom key=11255026
    (view changes)
    11:22 am
  6. page A Christmas Carol vocabulary edited ... p. 34 - “He rubbed his hands; adjusted his capacious waistcoat; laughed all over himself, from…
    ...
    p. 34 - “He rubbed his hands; adjusted his capacious waistcoat; laughed all over himself, from his shoes to his organ of benevolence; and called out in a comfortable, oily, rich, fat, jovial voice:
    ‘Yo ho, there! Ebeneezer!’”
    15th13th word: (to)
    p. 67 - “ He recoiled in terror, for the scene had changed, and now he almost touched a bed; a bare, uncurtained bed: on which, beneath a ragged sheet, there lay a something covered up…”
    Other example: to recoil from the sight of blood
    14th12th word: obscure
    p. 64 - “They left the busy scene, and went into an obscure part of the town, where Scrooge had never penetrated before, although he recognized its situation and its bad repute.”
    Other examples: an obscure village off in the country somewhere; My sister's husband likes obscure Anime movies as well as Japanese punk rock.
    13th11th word: (to)
    EXAMPLE sentence from the book:: p. 62 - “‘Lead on!’ said Scrooge. ‘Lead on! The night is waning fast, and it is precious time to me, I know. Lead on, Spirit!’”
    Other example sentence: Then, as the afternoon shadows were waning, the party again took to the canoes and paddled on up the river.
    12th10th word: affront
    p. 57 – “”…he would have made a feint of endeavouring (trying) to seize you, which would have been an affront to your understanding, and would instantly have sidled off in the direction of the plump sister.”
    Other example sentence:Turningsentence: Turning his back
    ...
    deliberate affront.
    11th

    9th
    word: dogged
    p. 44 – “”Scrooge entered timidly, and hung his head before this Spirit. He was not the dogged Scrooge he had been; and though its eyes were clear and kind, he did not like to meet them.”
    Other example sentence: His dogged persistence was constant and unwavering.
    10th8th word: tumultuous
    p. 39 “The noise in this room was perfectly tumultuous, for there were more children there than Scrooge in his agitated state of mind could count: and, unlike the celebrated herd in the poem, they were not forty children conducting themselves like one, but every child was conducting itself life forty.” (allusion to poem by William Wordsworth called “Written in March”)
    9th7th word: dirge
    p. 25–– “The spectre, after listening for a moment, joined in the mournful dirge; and floated out upon the bleak, dark night.”
    8th6th word: (to)
    p. 23 – “ ‘You are fettered,’ said Scrooge, trembling. ‘Tell me why.’“
    7th5th word: tacit
    p. 17 – “With an ill-will Scrooge dismounted from his stool, and tacitly admitted the fact (that it was time to go home) to the expectant clerk in the Tank, who instantly snuffed his candle out, and put on his hat.”
    Other EXAMPLE sentences:
    She indicated tacit approval by smiling and winking.
    By not reprimanding us for our antics, Mrs. Reimer showed her tacit approval of the pterodactyl game.
    6th5th word: (to)
    p. 17 – “The owner of one scant young nose, gnawed and mumbled by the hungry cold as bones are gnawed by dogs, stooped down at Scrooge’s keyhole to regale him with a Christmas carol...”
    5th4th word: misanthropic
    p. 17 – “The water-plug being left in solitude, its overflowings sullenly congealed, and turned into misanthropic ice.”
    EXAMPLE from other literature:
    “Reuben, a moody man, and misanthropic because unhappy, strode onward with his usual stern brow and downcast eye, feeling few regrets...” – Nathaniel Hawthorne, Mosses From An Old Manse and other stories
    4th3rd word: homage
    p. 15– “But I have made the trial in homage to Christmas, and I’ll keep my Christmas humour to the last.”
    Other EXAMPLE sentence: The musician paid a jazzy-classical homage to the Gershwin brothers in a rousing concert.
    3rd2nd word: morose
    p. 13 – “What right have you to be dismal? What reason have you to be morose? You’re rich enough”
    Other example sentences: He sat in moody silence, a morose and unsociable manner.
    (view changes)
    11:12 am
  7. page A Christmas Carol vocabulary edited ... {WordMap.doc} Flashcards for all words (and some extras) on QUIZLET (Thanks to Tim S.) and s…
    ...
    {WordMap.doc}
    Flashcards for all words (and some extras) on QUIZLET (Thanks to Tim S.) and synonyms and antonyms thanks to Amanda P.
    e.c. word: (to) regale (verb)
    p. 17 – “The owner of one scant young nose, gnawed and mumbled by the hungry cold as bones are gnawed by dogs, stooped down at Scrooge’s keyhole to regale him with a Christmas carol...”
    media type=custom key=11348696

    e.c. word: ruddy
    p.13 – “…it had not been light all day: and candles were flaring in the windows of the neighbouring offices, like ruddy smears upon the palpable brown air.”
    media type=custom key=11255202
    e.c. word: inexorable
    EXAMPLE sentence from the book:: p. 72 - “The inexorable finger underwent no change.”
    Other examples: an inexorable opponent; a feeling of inexorable doom
    media type=custom key=11807270
    e.c. word: opulence
    p. 46 – “”There were great, round, pot-bellied baskets of chestnuts, shaped like the waistcoats of jolly old gentlemen, lolling at the doors, and tumbling out into the street in their apoplectic (agitated) opulence.”
    Other example sentence: “The estate had formerly belonged to a gentleman of opulence and taste, who had bestowed some considerable attention to the adornment of his grounds.” – Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom’s Cabin
    media type=custom key=11597080
    e.c. word: sordid
    p. 37 “All your other hopes have merged into the hope of being beyond the chance of its (poverty's) sordid reproach. I have seen your nobler aspirations fall off one by one, until the master-passion, Gain, engrosses you.”
    media type=custom key=11514466
    e.c. word: capacious
    p. 34 - “He rubbed his hands; adjusted his capacious waistcoat; laughed all over himself, from his shoes to his organ of benevolence; and called out in a comfortable, oily, rich, fat, jovial voice:
    ‘Yo ho, there! Ebeneezer!’”
    media type=custom key=11494862
    14th
    15th word: (to) recoil (verb)
    p. 67 - “ He recoiled in terror, for the scene had changed, and now he almost touched a bed; a bare, uncurtained bed: on which, beneath a ragged sheet, there lay a something covered up…”
    Other example: to recoil from the sight of blood
    media type=custom key=11765202
    13th
    14th word: obscure (adj./ verb)
    p. 64 - “They left the busy scene, and went into an obscure part of the town, where Scrooge had never penetrated before, although he recognized its situation and its bad repute.”
    Other examples: an obscure village off in the country somewhere; My sister's husband likes obscure Anime movies as well as Japanese punk rock.
    media type=custom key=11757934
    12th
    13th word: (to) wane (verb)
    EXAMPLE sentence from the book:: p. 62 - “‘Lead on!’ said Scrooge. ‘Lead on! The night is waning fast, and it is precious time to me, I know. Lead on, Spirit!’”
    Other example sentence: Then, as the afternoon shadows were waning, the party again took to the canoes and paddled on up the river.
    media type=custom key=11635036
    11th
    12th word: affront (noun)
    p. 57 – “”…he would have made a feint of endeavouring (trying) to seize you, which would have been an affront to your understanding, and would instantly have sidled off in the direction of the plump sister.”
    Other example sentence:Turning his back on me was a deliberate affront.
    media type=custom key=11635032
    10th
    11th word: dogged (adj.)
    p. 44 – “”Scrooge entered timidly, and hung his head before this Spirit. He was not the dogged Scrooge he had been; and though its eyes were clear and kind, he did not like to meet them.”
    Other example sentence: His dogged persistence was constant and unwavering.
    media type=custom key=11574732
    9th
    10th word: tumultuous (adj.)
    p. 39 “The noise in this room was perfectly tumultuous, for there were more children there than Scrooge in his agitated state of mind could count: and, unlike the celebrated herd in the poem, they were not forty children conducting themselves like one, but every child was conducting itself life forty.” (allusion to poem by William Wordsworth called “Written in March”)
    media type=custom key=11530880
    8th
    9th word: dirge (noun)
    p. 25–– “The spectre, after listening for a moment, joined in the mournful dirge; and floated out upon the bleak, dark night.”
    media type=custom key=11478826
    7th
    8th word: (to)
    ...
    / fettered (verb)
    p. 23 – “ ‘You are fettered,’ said Scrooge, trembling. ‘Tell me why.’“
    media type=custom key=11413430
    6th
    7th word: tacit / tacitly (adj. / adv.)
    p. 17 – “With an ill-will Scrooge dismounted from his stool, and tacitly admitted the fact (that it was time to go home) to the expectant clerk in the Tank, who instantly snuffed his candle out, and put on his hat.”
    Other EXAMPLE sentences:
    She indicated tacit approval by smiling and winking.
    By not reprimanding us for our antics, Mrs. Reimer showed her tacit approval of the pterodactyl game.
    media type=custom key=11399456
    4th
    6th word: (to) regale
    p. 17 – “The owner of one scant young nose, gnawed and mumbled by the hungry cold as bones are gnawed by dogs, stooped down at Scrooge’s keyhole to regale him with a Christmas carol...”
    5th
    word: misanthropic (adj.)
    p. 17 – “The water-plug being left in solitude, its overflowings sullenly congealed, and turned into misanthropic ice.”
    EXAMPLE from other literature:
    “Reuben, a moody man, and misanthropic because unhappy, strode onward with his usual stern brow and downcast eye, feeling few regrets...” – Nathaniel Hawthorne, Mosses From An Old Manse and other stories
    media type=custom key=11348436
    3rd
    4th word: homage (noun)
    p. 15– “But I have made the trial in homage to Christmas, and I’ll keep my Christmas humour to the last.”
    Other EXAMPLE sentence: The musician paid a jazzy-classical homage to the Gershwin brothers in a rousing concert.
    media type=custom key=11317586
    2nd
    3rd word: morose (adj.)
    p. 13 – “What right have you to be dismal? What reason have you to be morose? You’re rich enough”
    Other example sentences: He sat in moody silence, a morose and unsociable manner.
    media type=custom key=11317342
    1st word: covetous (adj.)
    having or showing a great desire to possess something, typically something belonging to someone else: she fingered the linen with covetous hands.
    p. 12 – “Oh! But he was a tight-fisted hand at the grindstone, Scrooge! a squeezing, wrenching, grasping, scraping, clutching, covetous old Sinner!”
    media type=custom key=11255026
    (view changes)
    11:09 am

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